Sports Injury

About Sports Injuries
Sports injuries are injuries that occur when engaging in sports or exercise. Sports injuries can occur due to overtraining, lack of conditioning, and improper form or technique. Failing to warm up increases the risk of sports injuries. Bruises, strains, sprains, tears, and broken bones can result from sports injuries. Soft tissues like muscles, ligaments, tendons, fascia, and bursae may be affected. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is another potential type of sports injury.


Types of Sports Injuries
Pulled Muscle
Torn ACL
Torn MCL
Shin Splints
Stress Fracture
Plantar Fasciitis
Sprained Ankle
Tennis Elbow
Low Back Pain
Hip Bursitis
Concussion
Achilles Tendonitis
Runner's Knee


After Sports Injury
The swelling and much of the inflammation that follows an injury is largely due to the leakage of blood from the ruptured capillaries. Therefore, cold applications with ice can help by causing the blood vessels to constrict (clamp down). This constriction of the blood vessels prevents further leakage of blood and serum and minimizes swelling and pain. The cold from an ice pack application also has an added benefit of providing pain relief.
1. Rest (minimize movement of the injured body part)
2. Ice (apply a cold pack)
3. Compression (light pressure wrap to the affected body part can help minimize leakage of blood and swelling)
4. Elevation (raise the body part up so that the pressure from the blood and tissue swelling the affected area is reduced as the fluids drain from the area by gravity)

Sports Injury Prevention
Physical activity is an important part of maintaining overall health. However, certain precautions should be taken to minimize the risk of sports injuries.
Using the correct equipment and maintaining equipment can help prevent sports injuries. Wearing the recommended protective gear can help shield the body against injury.
Resting between workouts gives the body time to rest and repair.
Starting activity slowly and gradually increasing strength, flexibility, and endurance gives muscles, bones, and other tissues the opportunity to adapt to more difficult workouts, minimizing the risk of injury.
Finally, listening to the body and backing off at the first signs of pain, discomfort, stress, or overheating will help reduce the risk of sports injuries.
You will most likely not be allowed to put any weight on your arm or push against resistance with your hand until about 6 weeks after your surgery.