Foot and Ankle Surgery

About Foot and Ankle Surgery
Foot and ankle surgery is a specialised area of orthopaedic surgery. The surgery can be quite challenging and every patient is different with unique needs and goals.
You will need to follow instructions, perform appropriate exercises, and modify your activities during your healing process.
This requires patience, persistence, and a desire to get better. If you are unable to complete the post-operative instructions it will affect your results and you should consider alternative treatments.
Successful results from surgery require a contribution from you.
Whenever surgery is considered we always try to minimise the risks. You are already on this path by consulting an experienced orthopaedic surgeon who is a specialist in foot and ankle disorders. The body is a very complex and varied structure so although we aim for perfection, no specialist can give perfect results every time.
It is important that you read all of the information carefully. The information provided is intended to be a guide and not all-inclusive. If you have any questions, concerns, or are not certain about the benefits, risks, limitations, or alternatives to your treatment, please do not hesitate to ask your surgeon.
PAIN MANAGEMENT
A local anaesthetic block may be given to you during surgery. This will produce numbness around the nerves in the region of your surgical procedure. It will provide you with pain relief for approximately 12-18 hours post-operatively, enabling you to be comfortable and allow sleep after your surgery. It will also allow time to take some of your oral painkillers prior to the block wearing off and prevent a sudden onset of pain.
It is best to take your painkillers regularly for the first 1-2 weeks. Initially, prescription medication is usually necessary and after the initial 2-3 days, regular Panadol or Panadeine is usually all that is required.
It is also worthwhile taking painkillers prior to your first post-operative visit to ensure that plaster and suture removal is more comfortable.
Remember, pain is better managed if you get on top of it before it gets on top of you.